Camp Randall 100: Rolling Stones

Photo collage of images including a ticket of The Rolling Stones concert at Camp Randall Stadium in 1994
Photo collage of images including a ticket of The Rolling Stones concert at Camp Randall Stadium in 1994

The Camp Randall 100 honors a prestigious group of 100 people who shaped the first century of Camp Randall Stadium. Wisconsin Athletics will reveal a new honoree every day from May 24 until the Badgers’ 2017 opening game on Sept. 1 against Utah State.


“There isn’t a vacant hotel or motel room in the Madison area tonight because Rolling Stones’ fans have gobbled them all up.”

— The Capital Times reporting on the 1994
Rolling Stones Concert at Camp Randall Stadium


The summer of 1994 was a good one for fans of rock n’ roll in Madison.

Just over a month after Pink Floyd rocked a sold-out Camp Randall Stadium, the group that once considered itself to be the greatest band of all time rolled into town.

Fronted by the incomparable Mick Jagger, The Rolling Stones brought their Voodoo Lounge Tour to Camp Randall for an Aug. 24 concert in support of their newly-released album of the same name.

More than 50,000 tickets with a face value of $50 were sold. There isn’t a vacant hotel or motel room in the Madison area tonight because Rolling Stones’ fans have gobbled them all up, the Capital Times wrote on the day of the concert.

Though reviews would remark on a lack of energy in the crowd, the seats were filled when the show opened with Lenny Kravitz — fresh off a Grammy nomination for “Are You Gonna Go My Way” — before the Stones took center stage about 90 minutes later.

Jagger, 51 at the time, was joined by bandmates Charlie Watts, Keith Richards and Ronnie Wood for an energetic 2 1/2-hour performance that covered hits like “Miss You” and “Satisfaction” before closing with an encore performance of “Jumpin’ Jack Flash.”

Madison represented the seventh stop on the Voodoo Lounge Tour, which would include more than 100 stops and take the Stones across six continents over its year-long run.

With 129 shows in all, the Stones’ tour brought in $320 million to supplant Pink Floyd’s Division Bell Tour — which had made a stop in Madison just over a month earlier — as the highest-grossing of all time.

Three years after packing the place, the Stones returned to Camp Randall on Oct. 6, 1997, as part of the Bridges to Babylon Tour and drew a disappointing crowd of 27,078 for their 23-song set. Madison represented the fifth stop on that tour, which would once again take the band around the world.

Bridges to Bablyon became the second-highest grossing tour ever, bringing in $274 million to trail only the Voodoo Lounge Tour, but the Madison stop proved to be the final major concert to be held at Camp Randall.

Thin Photo collage of images including a ticket of The Rolling Stones concert at Camp Randall Stadium in 1994